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Fenugreek Extract

  • Trigonella foenum-graecum
  • Dried seed, 1:4 alcohol ratio
Fenugreek Extract

SKU
x_fe

Overview

Fenugreek seed has been used medicinally and for culinary purposes for millennia. It is most often utilized in Indian, Egyptian, and Middle Eastern cuisine, but is used commercially as a flavoring agent in much of the world. Its delicate maple-like flavor makes it perfect for baked goods and confectionaries and also for creating imitation maple syrups. Medicinally, it has been utilized in traditional herbalism to support digestion, support lactation in nursing mothers, and as a soothing topical application.

Herbal Actions

Nutritive, digestive, galactagogue, hypoglycaemic, demulcent,4,5 emollient,1,2 secretolytic, hyperemic, expectorant,3,5 emmenagogue6

Constituents

Carbohydrates, mucilaginous fiber (galactomannans), proteins (high in lysine and tryptophan), fixed oils pyridine-type alkaloids (such as trigonelline, choline, gentianine, and carpaine), flavonoids such as apigenin, luteolin, orientin, quercetin, vitexin, and isovitexin, free amino acids, such as 4-hydroxyisoleucine, arginine, histidine, and lysine; calcium and iron; saponins, glycosides (yielding steroidal sapogenins such as diosgenin, yamogenin, tigogenin, neotigogenin on hydrolysis), cholesterol and sitosterol, vitamins A, B1, C, and nicotinic acid, and volatile oils.2

Scientific Research

The Commission E approved internal use of fenugreek as an appetite stimulant and for use externally as a poultice.

Precautions

Specific: Not for use in pregnancy except under the supervision of a qualified healthcare practitioner.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

References

  1. Grieve M. A Modern Herbal. New York: Dover Publications, Inc. Accessed at http://botanical.com/botanical on October 15, 2014.
  2. Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckmann J, eds. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs. Austin, TX: American Botanical Council; Newton, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications; 2000.
  3. Khalsa Singh KP, Tierra M. The way of Ayurvedic herbs. Twin Lakes: Lotus Press; 2008.
  4. Mills, S. (1988). The dictionary of modern herbalism. Healing Arts Press.
  5. Mcintyre A. The Ayurvedic Bible: The definitive guide to Ayurvedic Healing: Ontario; Firefly Books Ltd. 2012.
  6. Hoffmann, D. (1998). The Herbal Handbook: A User's Guide to Medical Herbalism. Inner Traditions/Bear & Co.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.