Mountain Rose Herbs

Lady's Mantle Extract

Also known as

Alchemilla vulgaris and Alchemilla xanthochlora, Dewcup, Hairy Mantle, Lion’s foot, Bear’s foot, and Nine Hooks.

Introduction

Lady’s mantle is a perennial herb found in North America, Europe, and Asia. It has been referenced in many medicinal and magical circles since the middle ages. Its first appearance in a botanical tome was in Jerome Bock’s “History of Plants” in 1532. Its scientific name Alchemilla is a derivative of the Arab work Alkemelych, or alchemy, so called for the plant’s magical healing potency. Folklore concerning Lady’s Mantle seems to focus on the dew that is gathered on the leaves at the center of its furrowed leaves, which is said to be a key ingredient in several alchemical formulas. The dew was also said to be collected and used as a beauty lotion. Lady’s Mantle was first associated with the worship of the Earth Mother, but as Christianity spread, and like many pagan symbols before it, it was absorbed and eventually became associated with the Virgin Mary. Although its leaves bear a striking resemblance to cilantro, lady’s mantle is in the rose family.

Constituents

Tannins and flavonoids, chiefly quercetin.

Parts Used

The above-ground parts of the plant, dried.

Typical Preparations

Teas, extracts and seldom found encapsulated.

Precautions

None known.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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