Wormwood Powder

Certified Organic & Kosher Certified

  • OG
  • K
  • Artemisia absinthium
  • Origin: Albania
Wormwood Powder

SKU
wor_p4

Botanical Name

Artemisia absinthium

Overview

An ancient proverb claims, “as bitter as wormwood”, and indeed, wormwood is considered one of the most bitter herbs. It can be found growing wild in disturbed soils and is often cultivated in gardens, acting as a companion plant to deter pests and weeds. Historically, dried leaf bundles were hung inside the house and strewn in pantries and drawers for both its aromatics and to keep unwanted visitors away.

Wormwood is perhaps best known as an ingredient in absinthe, the famous alcoholic spirit noted for its strong effects. The herb has also been utilized for its bitterness, flavor, and green hue in many other liqueurs and aperitifs, including vermouth. Wormwood was employed in traditional European herbalism to support the digestive system. It’s uses date back to ancient Greece where it was utilized for intestinal parasites and as a general wellness tonic.

Plant Details

Artemisia absinthium is one of approximately 180 species in the genus Artemisia and a member of the of extensive Asteraceae family. Native to temperate climates in Europe, Asia, and Northern Africa, wormwood has since naturalized around the world. This herbaceous perennial has tall, branched stems with deeply segmented silver-green leaves. Wormwood can be found growing in gardens or in the wild amongst disturbed places and arid, uncultivated soils.

Herbal Wisdom

Wormwood, once a main ingredient in beer brewing, has since been replaced by hops. European folklore suggests that wormwood was utilized in making love potions and even acted as a remedy for accidental poisonings from mushrooms and other plants. Its scientific name, Artemisia, is derived from Artemis, the Greek goddess of wild creatures and the hunt. Greek legend states that the plant was delivered to Chiron, the father of medicine, by the goddess herself. The common name, wormwood, is suggested to have come from its historical use in expelling intestinal worms. Although, another reported root may originate from the Anglo-Saxon word “wermode” or “wermuth”, meaning “mind preserver”.

This Herb Appears In

Try making your own homemade vermouth using this recipe from our blog.

Parts Used

Dried aerial portions milled into powder.

Suggested Uses

Besides its use in liqueurs, such as vermouth, the powdered herb can be used in tincturing, homemade bitters recipes, or employed sparingly in soups and stews as a spice. Wormwood powder can also be incorporated into topical applications and dream pillows.

Precautions

Not for use during pregnancy or lactation. Not for long-term use; do not exceed recommended dose. Not to exceed 1.5 g of dried herb in tea, two to three times daily.
We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. For educational purposes only.