Mountain Rose Herbs

Buckwheat Sprouting Seed

Also known as

Fagopyrum esculentum

Introduction

Buckwheat is one of the world’s oldest domesticated plants, going back as far as 6000 B.C.E in Northern Asia. It is a broadleaf plant whose seeds are brown and about the size of a soybean. The plant itself has slender and knotty hollow stems and heart shaped leaves with beautiful white flowers. Its height averages about 3 feet at maturity. Buckwheat is grown all over the world, usually in warmer areas as it does not tolerate frost well. Flowering begins a few weeks after planting and will last until the plant is mature. The flowers themselves are an incredible source of nectar for honey bees. Buckwheat is not a cereal or a grass, but is referred to as a pseudo-cereal to emphasize that it is not related to wheat.

Constituents

The protein content of dehulled buckwheat is about 12%, with only 2% fat. Unlike wheat and corn, it is high in lysine. It is also rich in iron, magnesium, selenium, and zinc.

Parts Used

The sprouts, which are fast becoming as popular as alfalfa sprouts. You will have better sprouts if you use a Buckwheat seed which has had its outer shell hulled, although un-hulled seed is suitable.

Typical Preparations

Soak buckwheat seeds for no longer than 20 minutes, as they have a tendency to soak up water and then spoil. Rinse every 8 hours. The sprouts will show in as early as 1- 2 days. They will store best if dry to the touch before refrigeration.

Summary

Buckwheat contains no gluten, and is therefore good for people with gluten allergies. It can be used the same way that barley is used to produce malt for gluten free beer.

Precautions

None Known

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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