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Cinnamon Extract

  • Cinnamomum burmannii
  • Dried bark, 1:4 alcohol ratio
Cinnamon Extract



Cinnamon was utilized extensively thousands of years ago and is still popular today. Enjoyed since ancient times, cinnamon was mentioned in ancient Egyptian texts, the Bible, and was widely traded thousands of years ago in Europe and in Asia by Arab spice traders. Its scent is uniquely warming, uplifting, and stimulating, and its flavor sweet and delicious, hence the flavor and aroma have been utilized in countless confectioneries, baked goods, perfumes, cosmetics, beverages, and cordials. Recent scientific studies validate many of the traditional uses of this medicinal spice, indicating its health enhancing properties.2-9

Herbal Actions

Antioxidant, tonic, analgesic, circulatory stimulant, diaphoretic, alterative, expectorant,12 carminative, digestive, stomachic,10,11 emmenagogue1,11


Volatile oils mostly composed of: cinnamaldehyde, phenolic compounds, flavonoid derivatives, mucilage, calcium oxalate, resins, sugars, and coumarins.10 salicylic acid, anhyrdocinnzelanin, anhydrocinnzelanol13

Scientific Research

Cassia is approved by the German Commission E for stimulating appetite and also for its beneficial effects on digestion.10 Further, several studies indicate that cassia may help support healthy blood sugar4,5,7 and cholesterol levels.5 Recently, the results of a study demonstrated cassia's potential to promote would healing as well.9


Specific: Not for use in pregnancy except under the supervision of a qualified healthcare practitioner.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.


  1. American Herbal Products Association Botanical Identity References Compendium. Accessed at: http://www.botanicalauthentication.org/index.php/Cinnamomum_aromaticum_(bark) on August 19, 2014.
  2. Hlebowicz J, Hlebowicz A, Lindstedt S, Björgell O, Höglund P, Holst JJ, Darwiche G, Almér LO. Effects of 1 and 3 g cinnamon on gastric emptying, satiety, and postprandial blood glucose, insulin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide 1, and ghrelin concentrations in healthy subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Mar;89(3):815-21. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2008.26807. Epub 2009 Jan 21.
  3. Akilen, R., Tsiami, A., Devendra, D., & Robinson, N. (2010). Glycated haemoglobin and blood pressure‐lowering effect of cinnamon in multi‐ethnic Type 2 diabetic patients in the UK: a randomized, placebo‐controlled, double‐blind clinical trial. Diabetic Medicine, 27(10), 1159-1167.
  4. Crawford, P. (2009). Effectiveness of cinnamon for lowering hemoglobin A1C in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized, controlled trial. The Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, 22(5), 507-512.
  5. Khan, A., Safdar, M., Khan, M. M. A., Khattak, K. N., & Anderson, R. A. (2003). Cinnamon improves glucose and lipids of people with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes care, 26(12), 3215-3218.
  6. Ates, D.A. and O.T. Erdogrul. 2003. Antimicrobial activities of various medicinal and commercial plant extracts. Turk. J. Biol., 27:157-162.
  7. Mang, B., Wolters, M., Schmitt, B., Kelb, K., Lichtinghagen, R., Stichtenoth, D. O., & Hahn, A. (2006). Effects of a cinnamon extract on plasma glucose, HbA1c, and serum lipids in diabetes mellitus type 2. European journal of clinical investigation, 36(5), 340-344.
  8. Mohannad G. AL-Saghir , 2009. Antibacterial Assay of Cinnamomum cassia (Nees and Th. Nees) Nees ex Blume Bark and Thymus vulgaris L. Leaf Extracts against Five Pathogens. Journal of Biological Sciences, 9: 280-282.
  9. Choi, D. Y., Baek, Y. H., Huh, J. E., Ko, J. M., Woo, H., Lee, J. D., & Park, D. S. (2009). Stimulatory effect of _ Cinnamomum cassia_ and cinnamic acid on angiogenesis through up-regulation of VEGF and Flk-1/KDR expression. International immunopharmacology, 9(7), 959-967.
  10. Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckmann J, eds. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs. Austin, TX: American Botanical Council; Newton, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications; 2000.
  11. Grieve M. A Modern Herbal. New York: Dover Publications, Inc. Accessed at http://botanical.com/botanical on August 19, 2014.
  12. Mcintyre A. The Ayurvedic Bible: The definitive guide to Ayurvedic Healing. Ontario; Firefly Books Ltd. 2012.
  13. Duke J. A. Phytochemical and Ethnobotanical Databases. Accessed at http://www.ars-grin.gov/duke/ on August 19, 2014.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.