Mountain Rose Herbs

Black Cohosh Extract

Also known as

Cimicifuga racemosa, Actaea Macrotys, Actaea Racemosa, Black Snakeroot, Bugbane, Bugwort, Cimicifuga, Phytoestrogen, Rattle Root, Rattle Snakeroot, Rattlesnake Root, Rattleweed, Squawroot. Do not confuse with the potentially toxic blue cohosh.

Introduction

Black Cohosh is a flowering perennial, native to many parts of Canada and the United States. It thrives in old-growth coastal forests and regions of considerable biodiversity. The vast majority of the world’s black cohosh is produced and cultivated in the United States and Canada. The plant grows between three and six feet, with a stem that is clustered with tiny white flowers. The medicinal root is best collected between late July and September.

It was a favorite herbal remedy for Native Americans, who used it for a variety of ailments. The name cohosh is from the Algonquian tribe, and means rough, referring to the feel of the rhizome. It was given the name “bugbane” because the flowers have such a strong odor, and have been used to effectively repel insects.

Constituents

Actein, cimicifugin, formononetin, salicylic acid, tannins, vitamin C.

Parts Used

Root.

Typical Preparations

Finely chopped, dried root in tablets, teas, or tinctures.

Summary

Black cohosh is traditionally used to support women’s health, and is approved by the German Commission E for premenstrual discomfort and pain associated with normal menstruation. Black cohosh is also used in supporting a healthy menopause.

References

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20085176

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12224599?dopt=Abstract

Medicinal Plants of the Pacific West by Michael Moore (pg74-77)

Precautions

In menopausal women, black cohosh is not likely to cause any complications other than mild stomach upset. Black cohosh must be avoided during pregnancy because of its potential ability to stimulate uterine contractions. The safety of black cohosh in breastfeeding mothers and the degree of transmission of black cohosh in breast milk has not been established. There is controversy regarding the safety of black cohosh in women with a personal history or strong family history of breast cancer.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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