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Fennel Extract

  • Foeniculum vulgare
  • Dried seed, 1:4 alcohol ratio
Fennel Extract



Fennel was highly valued in the ancient world by Romans, Greeks, Egyptians, Chinese, and Indians for its value as a carminative, expectorant, and as a talisman used in various rituals. Fennel is a food plant that can be eaten as a vegetable, is prized as a tasty aromatic spice for a variety of Ayurvedic and Mediterranean dishes, and is used as a flavoring in various liqueurs such as gin and absinthe. Due to fennel's gentle nature, it is used to support digestion in infants and children, and can be given to nursing mothers.

Herbal Actions

bitter, pungent, warming, sweet8,9,10 aromatic, expectorant, digestive stimulant, carminative, antispasmodic, emmenagogue


essential oils, high in calcium, iron, potassium and vitamins A and C. 2,16 The essential oil contains anethole (50 to 80%), limonene (5%), fenchone (5%), estragole (methyl-chavicol), safrole, a-pinene (0.5%), camphene, b-pinene, b-myrcene and p-cymene14. fenchone is antibacterial and antispasmodic2


Specific: No known precautions.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.


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  12. Moore M. Los Remedios: Traditional Herbal Remedies of the Southwest. Santa Fe. New Mexico: The Museum of New Mexico Press; 1990.
  13. Moerman, D.E. 1998. Native American Ethnobotany. Accessed at http://herb.umd.umich.edu/ on June 23, 2014.
  14. Abascal, K., & Yarnell, E. (2008). Botanical galactagogues. Alternative and Complementary Therapies, 14(6), 288-294.
  15. Mohanty, I., Senapati, M. R., Jena, D., & Behera, P. C. Ethnoveterinary importance of herbal galactogogues-a review.
  16. Bergner P. Materia Medica Intensive Seminar. Boulder, CO: North American Institute of Medical Herbalism, Inc; 2005.  

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.