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Ginger Extract

  • Zingiber officinale
  • Fresh root, 1:2 alcohol ratio
Ginger Extract

SKU
x_ging

Overview

Ginger has been valued as a zesty spice and a reliable medicinal herb for centuries, with the first recorded uses found in ancient Sanskrit and Chinese texts.3,4 It has also been utilized in Greek, Roman, Arabic, and Unani Tibb traditional medicine practices3,4 and is now a widely known therapeutic herb in most parts of the world. It is a flavoring agent in beer, soft drinks, candies, and a staple spice and condiment in many countries. Ginger essential oil has been used in a vast array of cosmetics and perfumes.5 Further, its therapeutic properties, ranging from alleviating upset stomach to providing pain relief, are now being substantiated through a vast array of scientific studies.

Herbal Actions

appetite stimulant, carminative,5 anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-emetic3,7 spasmolytic, peripheral circulatory stimulant,19 diaphorhetic, analgesic, antibacterial, galactagogue7 antitussive, cardiotonic2 emmenagogue, sialagogue

Constituents

Ginger rhizome contains oleoresin composed of (phenols such as gingerols and their related dehydration products shogaols), fats and waxes, and volatile oils (1.0–3.3% the volatile oil contains sesquiterpenes, monoterpenes), 40–60% starch, 9–10% protien, 6–10% lipids composed of triglycerides, phosphatidic acid, lecithins, and free fatty acids, vitamins niacin and A, minerals; and amino acids.12

Precautions

Specific: No known precautions.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

References

  1. USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Germplasm Resources Information Network - (GRIN) [Online Database]. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland. Accessed at URL: http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?42254 on 13 July 2014.
  2. Khalsa Singh KP, Tierra M. The way of Ayurvedic herbs. Twin Lakes: Lotus Press; 2008.
  3. Ali, B. H., Blunden, G., Tanira, M. O., & Nemmar, A. (2008). Some phytochemical, pharmacological and toxicological properties of ginger ( Zingiber officinale Roscoe): A review of recent research. Food and chemical Toxicology, 46(2), 409-420
  4. Goel, R. K., & Sairam, K. (2002). Anti-ulcer drugs from indigenous sources with emphasis on Musa sapientum, tamrahbasma, Asparagus racemosus and Zingiber officinale. Indian journal of pharmacology, 34(2), 100-110.
  5. Leung AY, Foster S, eds. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Food, Drugs, and Cosmetics. 2nd ed. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc; 1996.
  6. Grieve M. A Modern Herbal. New York: Dover Publications, Inc. Accessed at http://botanical.com/botanical on July 14, 2014.
  7. Foster, S., & Chongxi, Y. (1992). Herbal emissaries: bringing Chinese herbs to the West: a guide to gardening, herbal wisdom, and well-being. Inner Traditions/Bear & Co.
  8. Ravindran, P. N., & Babu, K. N. (Eds.). (2004). Ginger: the genus Zingiber. CRC Press.
  9. Online Etymology Dictionary. Accessed at: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=ginger on July 14, 2014.
  10. Moore M. Medicinal Plants of the Pacific West. Santa Fe. New Mexico: Red Crane Books; 1993.
  11. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. GINGER. Post-harvest Operations Accessed at: http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/user_upload/inpho/docs/Post_Harvest_Compendium_-_Ginger.pdf on July 13 http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/265990.php 2014.
  12. Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckmann J, eds. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs. Austin, TX: American Botanical Council; Newton, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications; 2000.
  13. Medical News Today. Accessed at: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/265990.php on July 14, 2014.
  14. Dharmananda S. Institute for Traditional Medicine, Portland, Oregon Accessed at: http://www.itmonline.org/arts/ayurherb.htm on July 14, 2014.
  15. Cunningham, S. Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs. Woodbury: Llewellyn Publications; 2000.
  16. Bensky, D., Gamble, A., & Kaptchuk, T. J. (1993). Chinese herbal medicine: materia medica.
  17. Mills S, Bone K. Principles and Practice of Phytotherapy: Modern Herbal Medicine. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone; 2000.
  18. European Scientific Cooperative on Phytotherapy. ESCOP Monographs. 2nd ed. New York: Thieme New York; 2003.
  19. Ozgoli, G., Goli, M., & Simbar, M. (2009). Effects of ginger capsules on pregnancy, nausea, and vomiting. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 15(3), 243-246.
  20. Grontved A, Brask T, Kambskard J, et al. Ginger root against seasickness. Acta Otolaryngol 1988;105:45–9.
  21. Ribenfeld D, Borzone L. Randomized double-blind study comparing ginger (Zintona®) with dimenhydrinate in motion sickness. Healthnotes Rev Complementary Integrative Med 1999;6:98–101.
  22. Stewart JJ, Wood MJ, Wood CD, Mims ME. Effects of ginger on motion sickness susceptibility and gastric function. Pharmacology 1991;42:111–20.
  23. Holtmann S, Clarke AH, Scherer H, et al. The anti-motion sickness mechanism of ginger. Acta Otolaryngol 1989;108:168–74.
  24. Grontved A, Hentzer E. Vertigo-reducing effect of ginger root. ORL 1986;48:282.
  25. Lien, H. C., Sun, W. M., Chen, Y. H., Kim, H., Hasler, W., & Owyang, C. (2003). Effects of ginger on motion sickness and gastric slow-wave dysrhythmias induced by circular vection. American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, 284(3), G481-G489.
  26. Thomson, M., Al-Qattan, K. K., Al-Sawan, S. M., Alnaqeeb, M. A., Khan, I., & Ali, M. (2002). The use of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) as a potential anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic agent. Prostaglandins, leukotrienes and essential fatty acids, 67(6), 475-478.
  27. Srivastava KC, Mustafa T. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) in rheumatism and musculoskeletal disorders. Med Hypotheses 1992;39:342–8.
  28. Bliddal H, Rosetzsky A, Schlichting P, et al. A randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study of ginger extracts and ibuprofen in osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2000;8:9–12.
  29. Altman RD, Marcussen KC. Effects of a ginger extract on knee pain in patients with osteoarthritis. Arthritis Rheum 2001;44:2531–8.
  30. Stoilova, I., Krastanov, A., Stoyanova, A., Denev, P., & Gargova, S. (2007). Antioxidant activity of a ginger extract (< i> Zingiber officinale). Food chemistry, 102(3), 764-770.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.