Mountain Rose Herbs

Ginseng Root Whole

Also known as

Panax quinquefolius, American Ginseng, Anchi Ginseng, Canadian Ginseng, Ginseng, Ginseng Root, North American Ginseng, Occidental Ginseng, Ontario Ginseng, Panax quinquefolium, Red Berry, Ren Shen, Sang, Shang, Wisconsin Ginseng, Xi Yang Shen.

Introduction

There are actually three different herbs commonly called ginseng: Asian or Korean ginseng (Panax ginseng), American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius), and Siberian “ginseng” (Eleutherococcus senticosus), the latter herb having many of the same effects as the first two even though it is in a different plant family. American ginseng is grown in the Eastern portion of North America, along the entire eastern seaboard, from Quebec to Florida. Unlike Asian ginseng, which has “warming” properties, American ginseng has “cooling” properties and is noted for its thirst quenching effects. Native Americans in North America used it in the exact same way as the Chinese, as a preventative. When it was first discovered that ginseng did grow wild in North America, it became quite a big business. Daniel Boone, American folk hero and frontiersman, was known as a fur trader, but he actually made quite a fortune selling wild harvested ginseng.

Constituents

Acetic acid, adenine, adenosine, alanine, ascorbic acid, benzoic acid, beta-sitosterol, caryophyllene, cysteine, ferulic acid, folic acid, at least 10 different ginsenosides, glycine, guanidine, histidine, Isoleucine, kaempferol, magnesium, malic acid, niacin, pantothenic acid, salicylic acid, tannins, tyrosine, vanadium, zinc.

Parts Used

The mature root, washed, dried and cut.

Typical Preparations

Teas, extracts, or in capsules, and it is commonly found as an ingredient in soft drinks.

Summary

The vast majority of research regarding ginseng has been conducted on the Asian variety, rather than the American. The two species contain very similar properties and are often used interchangeably by herbalists. The American variety is in fact heavily prized in Asian communities where it is more difficult to find. Nevertheless, it is worth noting that the cited sources below are in reference to Asian ginseng, and not the American ginseng that we carry.

The German Commission E has approved ginseng for invigoration and fortification during times of need. It has been shown to improve reaction time and attention in healthy adult subjects. In older adults, ginseng has been shown to support healthy aging and memory.

References

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3528672?dopt=Abstract

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2268915?dopt=Abstract

Precautions

Most herbalists recommend taking American ginseng (or any other ginseng) for a month at a time, followed by a two-week “rest.”

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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