Mountain Rose Herbs

Rosemary Leaf

Also known as

Rosmarinus officinalis. Romero, and Dew of the Sea.

Introduction

Rosemary is an aromatic member of the mint family native to the Mediterranean region where it is utilized as a treasured culinary spice. It is a flowering evergreen, producing thin, needle-like leaves which are harvested for food or medicine. Rosemary plants are commonly cultivated and easily grown in many household gardens. They can grow prolifically and prefer full sun and well-drained soil, but can also thrive in pots on the windowsill.

There are many cultivators of rosemary worldwide, each with unique growth and flowering characteristics. Nevertheless, the flavor of rosemary is not highly variable and makes an excellent addition to many traditional dishes.

Constituents

1,8-cineole, acetic acid, camphor, carnosol, carvacrol, carvone, caryophyllene, chlorogenic acid, geraniol, hesperidin, limonene, luteolin, rosmarinic acid, salicylates.

Parts Used

Dried leaf.

Typical Preparations

Teas and tinctures, however it is most popularly used in cooking. The essential oil is used in aromatherapy but should not be taken internally.

Summary

Rosemary adds a delightful flavor to cuisine all across the world. The younger leaves are preferred for a sweeter flavor, standing up well to cooking, even at high temperatures. The smell of rosemary is piney and fresh; familiar but also distinctive. It is baked into breads and crackers, and is classically used as a rub for pork and lamb.

Rosemary leaves and essential oil are used in herbal medicine. Food manufacturers add rosemary to meats and sauces as an antioxidant and stabilizer. The herb is also used to make liqueurs, such as Benedictine and Danziger Goldwasser.

Medicinally, rosemary is approved by the German Commission E to support healthy digestion. It is also approved externally for healthy circulation and alleviation of joint pain. The oil is frequently used for aromatherapy, and has been shown to enhance alertness.

References

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10069621?dopt=Abstract

The Contemporary Encyclopedia of Herbs & Spices by T. Hill (pg. 267-269)

Precautions

Women who have heavy periods should avoid excessive use of rosemary, since it may stimulate menstrual flow. The herb should not be used medicinally during pregnancy. Small amounts of rosemary used in cooking, however, are safe for pregnant women and for women who have heavy periods.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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