Certified Organic & Kosher Certified

Mustard Seed, Yellow

  • Brassica alba
  • Origin: Canada
Mustard Seed, Yellow

SKU
mus_y1oz

Common Name

Standardized: white mustard
Other: yellow mustard

Botanical Name

Brassica alba Rabenh.
Plant Family: Brassicaceae

Synonyms

Brassica alba, Brassica hirta

Overview

Introduction

Most people would be surprised to learn that yellow mustard isn't yellow. The white herb powder is made yellow in the prepared condiment by the addition of turmeric. Dijon mustard is the condiment without the turmeric but with a relatively high concentration of mustard flour. Bordeaux mustard contains vinegar, sugar, and tarragon, and Meaux mustard is made with from mustard seeds that have been crushed rather than ground. The word mustard comes from the Latin "mustum ardems" meaning "burning must," or a spicy combination of mustard (burning) and freshly squeezed grape juice (must).

Yellow mustard is a flowering plant in the same family as brown or black mustard, wasabi, watercress, horseradish, and arugula, sharing a hot and pungent group of chemicals known as isothiocyanates. The isothiocyanates act as defense system against grazing animals by releasing burning chemicals when the plant is chewed. They destroy animal tissues, and they would also destroy the tissues of the plant except that they are stored in the plant in a different form that is only activated when the plant is disturbed. Mustard can be made from whole seeds or the pre-ground seeds, called mustard flour. Making mustard form the whole seeds takes time because the seeds have to soak as the distinctly "mustardy" flavor matures over several days. Mustard made from mustard flour is nearly instant but very hot. Mustard made from the pre-ground seeds, called mustard flour, is nearly instant. It is also quite hot.

Constituents

Yellow mustard contains more fiber and less oil than brown mustard. Like brown mustard, it contains about 1% sinigrin (allylglucosinolate), which is converted to the hot and pungent allyl isothiocyanate by the action of the enzyme myrosinase.

Parts Used

The whole seed, or ground.

Typical Preparations

Mustard is usually mixed with water, vinegar, wine, or with other juices.

May also be added to food, pickling spices, and is seldom found encapsulated.

Summary

Before there were lavatories, surgeons cleaned their hands with mustard. Yellow mustard can be used like brown mustard but for a milder effect. Yellow mustard seed powder is "hotter" than the whole seed.

Precautions

Specific: No known precautions.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.